Did you know?

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Resin beads are extremely popular, due in part to their vibrant colors, many designs and how lightweight they are. Resin beads are used to create jewelry like necklaces, bracelets and earrings, and even for craft and home décor projects. Created in the tiny village of Java in Indonesia, resin beads are still being made there today, giving natives steady employment. These Indonesian resin beads are still extremely popular today, but there are also many other countries that make these trendy beads as well.

 

Day is done above and below the ocean …

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“Mom pleaseeeeease can I have a sleep over?” Said the little Mermaid to her Mama. It was hard for her Mom to keep a straight face when telling her precious lil’ Mer daughter, “Absolutely not tonight.”  Well. You can tell who won that argument.

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The ever popular cowrie shell has many uses and meanings.  It has shown up in the form of money, jewelry, and religious accessories in almost every part of the world.   Found in the islands of the Indian Ocean, the cowrie shell soon gained popularity throughout much of ancient Africa.  Its influence, however, also spread to China, where  it was used as a form of currency to such an extent that the Chinese used its shape to form their pictograph for money!  Today excavations have found some of the money of ancient China in the form of brass and silver cowrie shells.   Wherever the cowrie shells were found, it seems as if it has been symbolized. 

Spiritually, according to African legend, if you are attracted to cowrie shells you could be family to an ocean spirit of wealth and earth.  It also represents Goddess protection which is very powerful and connected with the strength of the ocean.  Throughout Africa, and South and North America, the cowrie symbolized the power of destiny and prosperity.  Thought of as the mouth of Orsisas, it also is believed to have taught stories of humility and respect. 

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Claddagh (pronounced klä d ä) is an ancient village just outside Galway City in Ireland.

The ring gets its origin from Richard Joyce. Captured and taken from his homeland, Joyce was held as a slave in the West Indies. Eventually, he was sold to a Moorish goldsmith, where Joyce learned the art of jewelry making. Joyce eventually gained his freedom, and upon doing so, immediately went back to his homeland and settled down in the village of Claddagh. Here he continued his goldsmith practice by making Celtic jewelry – specifically producing the Claddagh to celebrate his return home and to have a symbol for his love of kin and country. As seen today, the Claddagh has become quite popular as a sign of betrothal as well as friendship and love. 

Me Casa…

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It is a well known fact among those of us who are Humans/Mermaids; that when one lives in a flat such as this. We are never shocked and take it in stride that we have our the midnight dip…we’re never alone.